© Anglo American School Of Sofia. all rights reserved.

Blog

Student Spotlight: Alexander V.

We are starting a new rubric on the AAS Blog: ‘Student Spotlight’. In the first issue, we interviewed scholarship student Alexander V. who is currently in grade 11 at AAS. He is an active member of the Angelia Club, The Student Council, The Prom Committee, SALT, The Student Ambassador Program, and Model United Nations. Alex is also a talented artist – he sings and plays the piano and was Stage Manager of the “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” Musical. You can hear him perform at the 5th Annual Benefit Gala on May 26th. …

Learn More

Is It Risky to Talk to Your Child About How They Are Feeling?

I love this time of the year. Spring brings sunny weather that warms our skin and rejuvenates our souls. I’m back to relaxing in Sofia parks and enjoying the view of downtown from my balcony. There is a pleasant buzz developing at school. Students and teachers alike know that a long vacation is around the corner, and there are signs that we are getting closer: we just enjoyed spring break, 12th-graders have completed classes and their graduation is a calendar page away. Prom tickets are being sold and prom dresses are being bought. There is a lot going on, but many of us have a bit more bounce in our step.  I was looking to match this sunny vibe with my article this week (counselors rotate in to discuss an aspect of wellness in each Weekly Howl). As I was mulling over ideas, however, an interesting article on teen loneliness and depression caught my attention. (“‘It’s Life or Death’: The Mental Health Crisis Among U.S. Teens” in The New York Times….

Learn More

Get to Know Your PTO

“I don’t see the value in joining PTO.” “Another bake sale… What for? I don’t see where all the money goes.” “I don’t like to fundraise, that’s all they do.” “Too much drama and politics, disguised under the mantra of “supporting our school”…” “They’re not of much help. When I needed them, I got no support.” Everyone of us has once heard, thought or said aloud such words about PTO. One could spend hours debating the whys and the wherefores, and I know for sure everyone of us has a different reason or story behind those lines, a singular perception of what this enigmatic organization could do for our community. We all have assumptions, and I had mine, quite well established. One day, not long ago, I was invited to be part of the organization. …

Learn More

The Selective University Myth*

Every year, organizations like U.S. News and Forbes publish their University rankings. Every year, universities like Harvard and Princeton come out on top, simultaneously ranked as the most selective schools. There is an inherent attraction to these highly selective schools. These are world-renowned institutes that ensure access to the global elite, the highly privileged. They also include a hefty price tag and incalculable years of strife and struggle for students who wish to gain admission. It cannot be argued that receiving a degree from these institutions doesn’t bring prestige. The mere names of these institutes on a resume can garner interviews and open doors like magic. But is it worth it? The answer may surprise you….

Learn More

The Magic of Words

According to the internet (so it must be true), there are 273,000 English words in the Oxford English Dictionary; there are 470,000 English words in Webster’s Dictionary. The Oxford dictionary is from the United Kingdom and Webster’s Dictionary is from the United States. The United States is larger than the United Kingdom, so it makes sense that the Webster’s Dictionary would have more words. (Somehow that makes sense, right?).  Each year, about a 1000 words are added to the Webster’s Dictionary: in my life over 50,000 new English words have been born. There are other dictionaries as well. One of my favorite words recently added to Dictionary.com is “sharent” which means “to frequently use social media to share photos or other details and information about one’s child”. In English, all it takes to become an official new word is making it into print many times. A friend recently used the word “psychologied”, which means to have psychology used on you. It is not actually a word, but it should be a word. I’m hoping that by putting it in print here it will be added to a dictionary next year. If Shakespeare invented over 1,700 words, it is fair that my friend can invent 1. …

Learn More

To Travel Sideways

It’s been nearly 20 years since I was bitten by the travel bug. That first destination, rather typically, was Paris, France. Everything down to the cobble stoned malls of Montmartre, right up to the interlaced architecture of the Eiffel Tower, blew my mind. However, the most useful element acquired, I’d come to appreciate many years later; the fact that you’ll never be one-hundred percent prepared for any new destination. And I’m not just referring to material matters like an awful accommodation or forgetting your raincoat and a favorite lipstick shade. I’m talking about being mentally prepared for whatever the journey may throw at you….

Learn More

The Power of Perspective

Perspective. This word has been on my mind recently. I have a new perspective on many things as a new mom. My little son, Orion, has a frequently changing visual perspective now that he has learned to roll over on his own. I look at things at AAS a bit differently sometimes from my perspective as a counselor than my colleagues who are classroom teachers or administrators. This week is parent-teacher conferences. The purpose is to share school and home perspectives to find the best way together to support our children’s growth. Perspective is an important wellness concept for many reasons, including helping us cope with uncomfortable feelings and supporting effective problem solving….

Learn More

What kind of parent are you?

What if I told you that there was one thing you could do for your children that would ensure they grow up to be more empathetic and kind; would help them resist peer pressure; would lead them to become responsible and able to self-regulate; would improve their decision making; would develop their respect for adults, other people and rules; would greatly reduce their risk of depression, anxiety, teen pregnancy and drug use; and would build secure attachments and strong relationships with you, their parents?…

Learn More

‘Just Keep Swimming’

I am a sucker for animated films. Ratatouille, Encanto (“We don’t talk about Bruno, no, no…”), Moana, Frozen (yep, Frozen), and almost all of the rest: and of course Finding Nemo. I say “almost all of the rest”, because I never liked the Mickey Mouse films or cartoons. I guess that’s because I have an aversion to rodents. I’ve never liked rodents, and rats freak me out (it took me a while to appreciate Ratatouille). Even squirrels give me the creeps. I think of squirrels as fuzzy tailed tree rats. My daughter, though, has a zillion photos of a squirrel named Alberto who lives in a tree at our house. Beavers are cool, because they are unique and industrious. Capybara are also ok: they are noble somehow. Lemmings are fascinatingly weird, but I wouldn’t want to run into a slice of them. …

Learn More

Run! It’s Fun!

Scientists say long distance running is a mental exercise. You compete mainly with yourself and at the finish you feel great joy and satisfaction from your achievement, you celebrate the power of your spirit which proved to be stronger than you thought. Of course you are happy with the medal and in the end you want to share your joy and hug other finishers no matter that you met them only now. In 2010 my husband and I met with 3 other running enthusiasts over a coffee to brainstorm on how we can promote running as a healthy lifestyle, a way to meet friends and have fun, and support social causes by organizing sports events.  Who would have imagined that 10 years later the Begach club would organize 15+ sports events annually with 6000+ participants, 20000+BGN in donations, and each event with 160+ volunteers….

Learn More